La Jolla Dentistry: Dr. D’Angelo and team know the power of a smile – La Jolla Light

The dental trio of Dr. Joseph D’Angelo, Dr. Ashley Olson and Dr. Ryan Hoffman comprise one of the largest dental practices in La Jolla — in both number of dentists and office space.

Recently, they expanded their hours to make their comprehensive dentistry services more convenient for their patients. Now, the La Jolla Dentistry office is open Monday and Wednesday evenings, and also on Saturdays, which is quite unusual for a dental practice.

Dr. Ryan Hoffman, who joined the team almost two years ago, told the Light that accommodating the lives of their busy patients is important. “In addition to the technology and all the services we provide, the convenience of coming here is key for working families with children in school, or for college students with strict schedules.”

The D’Angelo, Olson, Hoffman dental office has been located at 1111 Torrey Pines Road since 2004, when Dr. D’Angelo ran a solo practice. “I started out with one or two treatment rooms and gradually doubled in size,” he said. “Then, we doubled again. We have 10 treatment rooms now, and we’ve increased the types of services we provide.”

He said the office is fully equipped to handle just about any dental concern — from implants to veneers, gum recontouring, cosmetic and restorative dentistry, and Invisalign treatments.

Dr. Olson, who joined Dr. D’Angelo seven years ago, noted: “We are continually evolving technology in our office so it gives us added tools to provide exceptional care.”

The philosophy of providing impeccable care permeates throughout the staff, and Dr. D’Angelo is proud of creating such a culture. The office space has a warm and welcoming feel and the treatment rooms have TVs in the ceiling and mounted on the wall.

Dr. Hoffman pointed out that more younger clients are coming in the door these days: “I’m seeing and hearing a lot more in terms of cosmetics, whether it’s Invisalign or veneers, or before-and-after products, because social media makes dentistry so accessible to many more people these days.”

Dr. D’Angelo added: “Every patient seems to have an understanding that they need to take care of their teeth, and fillings and crowns and cleanings are part of that. But I still say two-thirds of what we do is want-based. For the vast majority of people, even though they have regular dental needs, the things they want seem to take precedence over things they know they need.

“People have come to realize that a smile they feel comfortable with — and a smile they can share with other people — impacts everybody around them.”

He explained that patients aren’t accepting ugly removable appliances and bridges anymore, either, they want implants and Invisalign, and they want their teeth white. Those desires drive the practice, with 3,000 patients and more walking through the door each day.

All three dentists agree that it really all comes down to the power of a smile.

As Dr. Olson put it: “(A beautiful smile) improves your work life, your love life, and your sense of self-esteem.” Dr. Hoffman added that on a personal note, “I have friends who’ve never been in a serious relationship and they’ve invested in their smile and now they’re engaged! It’s not necessarily the smile that did that, but it’s the confidence that came from the smile that altered their personality.”

And that smile power is also reaching seniors. Dr. D’Angelo commented: “It’s amazing how many people in their 70s are still highly concerned about how their smile looks. When they feel confident about their smile it makes them feel younger, feel healthier, feel more engaged. We’re changing people’s lives. From that standpoint, what we do is incredibly rewarding.”

The La Jolla Dentistry office of Dr. Joseph D’Angelo, Dr. Ashley Olson and Dr. Ryan Hoffman at 1111 Torrey Pines Road, Suite 101 in La Jolla is a fee-for-service practice, which means it participates with all PPO plans as an out-of-network provider. (858) 459-6224. joethedentist.com

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Courtesy Photo
The reception area at La Jolla Dentistry, 1111 Torrey Pines Road, Suite 101, La Jolla. (858) 459-6224. joethedentist.com
The reception area at La Jolla Dentistry, 1111 Torrey Pines Road, Suite 101, La Jolla. (858) 459-6224. joethedentist.com (Courtesy Photo)

This content was originally published here.

The Bond Between Grandparents and Grandchildren Has Health Benefits for Both, According to a Study

The Bond Between Grandparents and Grandchildren Has Health Benefits for Both, According to a Study

In the modern world where both parents work full-time and crave professional success, the number of grandparents who are raising grandchildren is increasing rapidly. For many adults, the “intrusion” of grandparents is annoying, because, after all, it’s about their children, “and they know what’s best for them.”

If you have doubts about whether or not to allow your elders to participate in the upbringing of your child, we at Bright Side can tip the scales in favor of the love and care that only grandparents can offer.

Grandparents are good for your health.

The cultural and social situations that occur today have strengthened the relationships between grandchildren and grandparents, mainly because the number of households where both parents work full-time is continuing to grow. In addition, the family disintegration rate is increasingly high. Because of this, there are several studies that have been dedicated to investigating the connection between the bond that grandparents have with their grandchildren and the welfare of the latter.

A special investigation, carried out by the University of Oxford, showed that frequent contact and loving connections between grandparents and their grandchildren generate social and emotional well-being in children and young people. This bond protects grandchildren from problems with development that they could face and boosts their social and cognitive abilities. In addition, “close relationships between grandparents and grandchildren buffered the effects of adverse life events, like parental separation, because it calmed the children down,” says Dr. Eirini Flouri, one of the authors of the study.

It’s not enough to just be close, you also have to get involved.

These conclusions and results were revealed thanks to the analysis of 1,596 children of different ages in England and Wales. Different aspects like socioeconomic status, grandparents’ age, and the level of closeness in the relationship were evaluated. 40 in-depth interviews were also conducted with children from different backgrounds. These surveys, in addition to revealing the healthy benefits that this bond brings, also gave an overview of the importance of these relationships in our society, since almost a third of maternal grandmothers provide regular care for their grandchildren, and 40% provide occasional help with childcare.

The study focused mainly on children who were about to become teenagers, those who, surprisingly and contrary to what one might think, accept the relationship with their grandparents with great satisfaction and love. The reason? The survey revealed that today’s grandparents often have more time than parents to help young people in their activities, in addition to being in a position that gives them greater confidence to talk with their grandchildren about any problems they may be experiencing. However, the emotional closeness may not be enough: grandparents should be involved in education and help solve youth problems, as well as talk with teenagers about their future plans.

The benefits that grandchildren bring to grandparents

The relationships and bonds that grandchildren and grandparents have can also improve the well-being of older adults. A study by the Institute of Gerontology at the School of Social and Public Policy in London found that the grandparent-grandchild relationship is strongly associated with the quality of life of older adults regarding their health. This means that grandparents, mainly grandmothers, who provide care for their grandchildren, enjoy better physical health. The study highlighted the importance of leading a relationship that does not fill grandparents with responsibilities and lets them lead a life without major worries. Otherwise it could cause depression.

The research was based on official data of 8,972 women and 6,567 men, 50 years of age or older, who had one or more grandchildren at the start of the study and lived in Austria, Belgium, Switzerland, Germany, Denmark, Spain, France, Italy, Greece, the Netherlands and Sweden, contemplating a period of 5 years.

We believe that the help and advice of those who raised us and can now help us raise our children should always be welcomed.

How close were you to your grandparents? What is the relationship that your children have with their grandparents? We would absolutely love to read your stories and opinions in the comments section.

Preview photo credit Coco / Disney Pixar

This content was originally published here.