How Invisalign® Encourages My Teen’s Passion for Adventure

This post was sponsored by the Invisalign® brand and all opinions expressed in my post are my own.

My teen is always up for an adventure. If you asked Ryan what his favorite hobbies are, he’d tell you traveling and photography. He loves an adventure. We all do. It’s one of the reasons I homeschool, or road school, to be able to take our learning on the go. Whether we’re at home or exploring El Morro in Puerto Rico we’re not ones to turn down an adventure!

That’s one of the reasons we love Invisalign® treatment so much!

Invisalign aligners are transforming Ryan’s smile without compromise and with more predictability* thanks to SmartTrack® material. With over 20 years of innovation and 7 million+ smiles have enabled Invisalign treatment to correct simple to complex orthodontic cases, like Ryan’s. He can continue to go on all the adventures, eat all the things he likes (and even try new foods) while in treatment. Unlike traditional braces, there’s no restrictions when it comes to food! So there’s no holding him back when it comes to eating his way through our travels. (*compared to 0.30 inch off-the-shelf aligners)

Before we started his treatment, Ryan and I sat down and went over all the instructions from Dr. Segal, his orthodontist at Segal & Iyer. I made sure he understood that this was his responsibility. I cannot wear his Invisalign® aligners for him, only he can.

In order for his treatment to be successful, he has to make sure he follows all the directions Dr. Segal gave him. 

It’s been about 10 weeks since he started treatment and he’s done phenomenally well. He wears his aligners all day long, only taking them out to eat or drink. In just these 10 weeks, he’s already notified such a difference in his smile that it encourages him to keep going.

It’s boosted his confidence so much and he readily smiles more for pictures and throughout our whole trip.

Plus we didn’t have to worry about any unexpected office visits (like you do with traditional braces) while we’re away. If a set of aligners break, you just move back to your old set or up to you new set.* That’s it!

*Consult your Invisalign provider before reverting to previous aligners or wearing new aligners

When his case fell out of his backpack in Disney and his top aligners broke, we didn’t worry. He just moved onto the next pack. Simple as can be.

I always try to include an educational aspect into all our trips. Since we homeschool and travel a lot, I use every place we visit as a learning tool. Whether it’s through the local cuisine or just immersing ourselves into the local scene, he’s able to enjoy anything our adventures bring while not having to worry about his orthodontic treatment.

When it comes time to plan out our trips, we don’t worry that Invisalign treatment will hold us back. Invisalign aligners give him ( and me) the confidence to know that he can try all the new foods he wants and we won’t have to avoid any restaurants tough to chew foods. Plus since Invisalign aligners transform his smile without compromise, we can still get the perfect family shot or selfie where he’s actually smiling.  When we sit down and discuss what historical sites or things we want to learn more about and make a list of things to see and do, and Ryan makes sure to packing his aligners is at the top of that list!

Sometimes I even put him in charge of all our educational activities and I let him plan the whole itinerary.  It’s doubles as a research project. He’ll look into the different sites and activities available and pick out ones he thinks we’ll all enjoy.

If you or your child need orthodontic care, Invisalign aligners are a convenient choice for active and jet-setting families.

Invisalign aligners let you transform your smile without compromise, so nothing holds Ryan back from hiking, swimming and truly exploring and immersing himself into wherever we’ll be.

Parents, you can learn more about Invisalign treatment for your tween or teens here, and be sure to take the free Smile Assessment for them!

To find an Invisalign provider near you, check out the Doctor Locator!

Dawn

The post How Invisalign® Encourages My Teen’s Passion for Adventure appeared first on A New Dawnn.

This content was originally published here.

Spanish socialist govt moves to let doctors kill sick patients as health care costs rise

MADRID, February 14, 2020 (LifeSiteNews) — A majority in the lower chamber of Spain’s Congress has voted to consider a bill that would legalize euthanasia and assisted suicide in case of “clearly debilitating diseases without a cure, without a solution and which cause significant suffering.”

Spanish daily El País reported that the 350-member Congress of Deputies passed a measure on Tuesday by a vote of 201 to 140, with two abstentions. Following debate in committee, the bill would go to the Senate for a final vote. In its current form, if passed, the law would allow voluntary euthanasia as well as assisted suicide. This is the third time the bill has emerged in Congress, where its proponents hope it will be approved in June.

Assisted suicide means that a doctor prescribes lethal drugs to a patient, who then self-administers the drugs. Voluntary euthanasia can be defined as when a physician or medical professional kills a patient at the patient’s request. Both forms of killing are legal in Belgium, Canada, Colombia, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and in the state of Victoria in Australia. Switzerland and some states in the U.S. allow assisted suicide.

Both forms of dealing death would be legalized by the Spanish legislation, which would allow doctors to object on the basis of conscience but require them to refer patients to doctors willing to assist in death. The bill also requires that patients not have to wait more than a month after making a request for either assisted suicide or euthanasia. After two doctors consider an initial request, patients would then make an additional request for approval by a government committee.

The Catholic Church, as well as the Popular Party and Vox Party, has expressed vehement opposition to the bill. From the floor of Congress, Deputy José Ignacio Echániz of the Popular Party accused Spain’s socialist government on Tuesday of seeking to “save money” on care for “people who are expensive at the end of their lives.” He said, “For the Socialist Party, euthanasia is cost-saving measure.”

Euthanasia as cost-saving measure

Echániz said the socialist government is having trouble paying for its welfare policies: “Every time one of these people with these characteristics disappears, there also disappears an economic and financial problem for the government. For each one of these people who is pushed toward death by euthanasia, the government is saving a great deal. Behind this is a leftist philosophy to avoid the social cost of an aging population in our country.”

While offering legislation to improve palliative care, Echániz said it is “curious” that despite Spain’s excellent medical care, socialists are calling for euthanasia rather than “defending life until the last moment.”

Madrid mayor José Luis Martínez-Almeida and city chief executive Isabel Díaz Ayuso, both of whom represent the Popular Party, also denounced the bill. In an interview with Antena 3 radio, Díaz Ayuso reproached the socialists for their reasoning, saying, “Death is not dignity; it is death,” and added, “Life is dignity.” The euthanasia bill, she argued, is a “red herring” being offered by her opponents to distract from their failings.

Speaking for the pro-life Vox Party, Rocio Monasterio said in a news conference on Tuesday that Vox will mount strong opposition the bill. “We believe in the dignity of the person,” she said while calling for more resources for palliative care. Vox, she said, defends the dignity of people from conception to natural death, unlike the leftists, who “want to eliminate all those whose lives, according to the Socialist Party, are no longer useful.”

Vox Deputy Lourdes Méndez took to the floor on Tuesday, warning Congress that they had embarked on legislation that resembled Nazi law of the 1930s with which the German Third Reich could legally murder mentally and physically handicapped people who had been judged “unfit.”

Méndez said, “The weakest and most vulnerable would be pressured by the system and would come to feel that they are a burden.” While she also proposed a bill for palliative care, she said, “In the face of suffering, we propose to offer companionship; we propose a culture of care and propose to relieve pain. You propose in the face of suffering to eliminate the sick; you propose death.” Speaking directly to the socialists, she said, “May God forgive you!”

The Spanish bishops’ conference has condemned euthanasia, issuing a document titled “Sowers of Peace” in December, saying that the Tradition and Magisterium of the Church “have been constant in stressing the dignity and sacredness of every human life” and its opposition to legalized euthanasia and assisted suicide.

The Church, the document reads, offers various ways of accompanying the sick and suffering, “shaping the many charisms that have inspired many institutions and congregations dedicated to their care.” This is based on the words of Jesus Christ, who said, “I was sick, and you visited me” (Matt. 25:36), and in the parable of the Good Samaritan (Lk. 10:25–37).

Critics of the leftist euthanasia bill point out that both euthanasia and assisted suicide are beyond the scope of medicine and also violate the Hippocratic Oath, well enshrined in the medical profession, which states: “I will neither give a deadly drug to anybody who asked for it, nor will I make a suggestion to this effect.”

In a statement, the Catholic bishops said there is a flawed belief that assisted suicide and euthanasia are acts of autonomy, saying: “[I]t is not possible to understand euthanasia and assisted suicide as something that refers exclusively to the autonomy of the individual, since such actions involve the participation of others, in this case, of health personnel.” Instead of promoting death, Spain should instead embrace palliative care that can ease suffering, they said.

Fr. Pedro Trevijano Etcheverria, a Spanish theologian and columnist, reacted to the vote that came on the day Catholics commemorate the apparition of the Virgin Mary at Lourdes to a simple peasant girl, Bernadette, in 1800s France. The shrine at Lourdes, which is known all over the world for its healing waters, has drawn millions of ailing visitors and their companions for more than a century. Tuesday is also known among Catholics also as the International Day of the Sic, Trevijano Etcheverria mused, pointing out that while the irony of advancing a bill to kill sick people on that day might have been lost on Spain’s leftists, it would be easily recognized by Satan.

This content was originally published here.