Decades of Dentistry: David Newman, DMD of Kilmarnock

“I fit the mold of having an interesting story about how I came to live—and practice—in the Northern Neck,” says Kilmarnock dentist David Newman.

“My grandmother grew up in Virginia. At one point, she was visiting with friends in Gloucester. They were having dinner with some people from the Northern Neck. One of the dinner guests from the Northern Neck mentioned that the local dentist was ill and was interested in selling his practice. My grandmother shared this bit of news with my parents, who, in turn, shared it with me. Well, I had just graduated from the University of Pennsylvania dental school and was working long days and some evenings for three different practices. I knew that wasn’t the professional life I wanted. So, I contacted the Northern Neck dentist, Dr. Brumback, and my wife Debbie and I made arrangements to meet him in Kilmarnock in front of a dress shop on Main Street.”

Anyone who has ever got off Interstate 95 and headed down Route 3 to Lancaster County knows it’s a long drive that seems to go on forever. “Debbie and I finally arrived in Kilmarnock. We easily found the dress shop on Main Street and I gave Dr. Brumback a call. He met us, and showed us his office and around the area. We hit it off. So, the next thing I knew, Dr. Brumback introduced me to Douglas Monroe, Jr., president and CEO of Chesapeake Bank. Doug and Chesapeake Bank worked with me to purchase the practice. It was the first of many business and personal banking experiences I’ve had with Chesapeake Bank. They’ve been my bank since day one,” says Newman.

Living in the Northern Neck

Moving from an urban or suburban region to a rural area can be an adjustment for some people, but for Newman, the bay, rivers and tributaries that surround the Northern Neck hold a special appeal. “I grew up on the Jersey shore and was always on the water. That’s what attracted me to the Northern Neck and Lancaster County.”

34 Years Later

“It’s been a great run for me. I enjoy knowing my patients and seeing them outside of my practice. I would like to bring in an associate to help me continue to offer high-quality dental care. I’m certain Chesapeake Bank will help them, too, so they can make their home here. It would be nice to get in a little more time on my boat with my rod and reel,” says Newman, grinning.

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This content was originally published here.

About half of France’s coronavirus patients in intensive care are under 65, health official says

A French health official says warnings to stay home in the coronavirus pandemic are in some cases falling on deaf ears while noting that the virus hasn’t just been posing a risk to seniors.

French health ministry official Jérôme Salomon said Monday that the situation is “deteriorating very quickly” while providing this statistic: of the between 300 and 400 coronavirus patients in intensive care in France, about half of them are younger than 65, The New York Times reports.

Salomon is looking to “dispel the notion that the virus seriously threatens only the elderly,” the Times reports, and Mother Jones observes that even though the novel coronavirus is “understood to be particularly lethal among the elderly,” these numbers “underscore the reality that younger generations can still face serious consequences.”

Salomon also said Monday that in France, “a lot of people have not understood that they need to stay at home,” and as a result, “we are not succeeding in curbing the outbreak of the epidemic,” per Reuters. Most nonessential businesses in France were ordered to be closed over the weekend.

France has confirmed more than 5,400 cases of the novel coronavirus, and by Sunday, the number of deaths had risen to 127. Salomon said Monday the number of cases has been doubling “every three days.” Brendan Morrow

NBCUniversal announced Monday it will make Universal Pictures films that are playing in theaters right now, including The Invisible Man and The Hunt, available to rent at home for $19.99 beginning this Friday, per The Hollywood Reporter. The rental period will last 48 hours. This is a game-changer for theatrical moviegoing, as major studio films typically play in theaters exclusively for about three months before being made available for home viewing. The Hunt hit theaters just three days ago.

Universal’s new policy will also apply to at least one upcoming movie: Trolls World Tour, which is set to be made available digitally on the same day it’s released in theaters — at least, the theaters that are still open. The policy isn’t expected to apply to all of Universal’s upcoming movies, the Reporter says.

“We hope and believe that people will still go to the movies in theaters where available, but we understand that for people in different areas of the world that is increasingly becoming less possible,” NBCUniversal CEO Jeff Shell said.

Is Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) ready to join the Yang Gang?

Romney is out with a proposal that should make entrepreneur and former 2020 Democratic candidate Andrew Yang proud, on Monday saying every American adult should receive a check for $1,000 amid the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic.

This step, Romney said, will “help ensure families and workers can meet their short-term obligations and increase spending in the economy.” Romney added that “expansions of paid leave, unemployment insurance, and SNAP benefits” are also “crucial,” but the $1,000 check “will help fill the gaps for Americans that may not quickly navigate different government options.”

The Utah senator offered numerous other proposals for responding to the coronavirus crisis, including providing grants to small businesses impacted by the pandemic and deferring student loan payments “for a period of time to ease the burden for those who are just graduating now, in an economy suffering because of the COVID-19 outbreak.”

Yang’s central proposal during his 2020 campaign was to provide Americans with a universal basic income of $1,000 a month, an idea that some Democrats have been re-upping in the midst of the coronavirus crisis. Like Romney, Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) is also backing the $1,000 payment idea, saying a check in that amount should go to all middle class and low-income adults because “we can’t leave the hardest-hit Americans behind.”

Romney’s proposal is for a one-time check and not a monthly payment as Democrats like Yang have called for. But Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) tweeted Monday, “GOP & Democrats are both coming to the same conclusion: Universal Basic Income is going to have to play a role in helping Americans weather this crisis.”

This content was originally published here.